Children’s Catechism, week 13

March 30, 2015

Q. 43. With whom did God the Father make the covenant of grace?
A. With Christ, his eternal Son.

Q. 44. Whom did Christ represent in the covenant of grace?
A. His elect people.

Q. 45. What did Christ undertake in the covenant of grace?
A. To keep the whole law for his people, and to suffer the punishment due to their sins.


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 13

March 29, 2015

13. Lord’s Day

Q. 33. Why is Christ called the “only begotten Son” of God, since we are also the children of God?
A. Because Christ alone is the eternal and natural Son of God; [a] but we are children adopted of God, by grace, for his sake. [b]

Q. 34. Wherefore callest thou him “our Lord”?
A. Because he hath redeemed us, both soul and body, from all our sins, not with silver or gold, but with his precious blood, and has delivered us from all the power of the devil; and thus has made us his own property. [a]


Westminster Confession, week 13

March 28, 2015

Chapter 8: Of Christ the Mediator

1: It pleased God, in His eternal purpose, to choose and ordain the Lord Jesus, His only begotten Son, to be the Mediator between God and man,[161] the Prophet,[162] Priest,[163] and King,[164] the Head and Savior of His Church,[165] the Heir of all things,[166] and Judge of the world:[167] unto whom He did from all eternity give a people, to be His seed,[168] and to be by Him in time redeemed, called, justified, sanctified, and glorified.[169]

2: The Son of God, the second person of the Trinity, being very and eternal God, of one substance and equal with the Father, did, when the fullness of time was come, take upon Him man’s nature,[170] with all the essential properties, and common infirmities thereof, yet without sin;[171] being conceived by the power of the Holy Ghost, in the womb of the virgin Mary, of her substance.[172] So that two whole, perfect, and distinct natures, the Godhead and the manhood, were inseparably joined together in one person, without conversion, composition, or confusion.[173] Which person is very God, and very man, yet one Christ, the only Mediator between God and man.[174]


Canons of Dordt, week 13

March 27, 2015

The First Head of Doctrine: Divine Election and Reprobation

Having set forth the orthodox teaching concerning election and reprobation, the Synod rejects the errors of those

V

Who teach that the incomplete and nonperemptory election of particular persons to salvation occurred on the basis of a foreseen faith, repentance, holiness, and godliness, which has just begun or continued for some time; but that complete and peremptory election occurred on the basis of a foreseen perseverance to the end in faith, repentance, holiness, and godliness. And that this is the gracious and evangelical worthiness, on account of which the one who is chosen is more worthy than the one who is not chosen. And therefore that faith, the obedience of faith, holiness, godliness, and perseverance are not fruits or effects of an unchangeable election to glory, but indispensable conditions and causes, which are prerequisite in those who are to be chosen in the complete election, and which are foreseen as achieved in them.

This runs counter to the entire Scripture, which throughout impresses upon our ears and hearts these sayings among others: Election is not by works, but by him who calls (Rom. 9:11-12); All who were appointed for eternal life believed (Acts 13:48); He chose us in himself so that we should be holy (Eph. 1:4); You did not choose me, but I chose you (John 15:16); If by grace, not by works (Rom. 11:6); In this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son (1 John 4:10).


Larger Catechism, week 13

March 26, 2015

Q. 57. What benefits hath Christ procured by his mediation?
A. Christ, by his mediation, hath procured redemption,[247] with all other benefits of the covenant of grace.[248]

Q. 58. How do we come to be made partakers of the benefits which Christ hath procured?
A. We are made partakers of the benefits which Christ hath procured, by the application of them unto us,[249] which is the work especially of God the Holy Ghost.[250]

Q. 59. Who are made partakers of redemption through Christ?
A. Redemption is certainly applied, and effectually communicated, to all those for whom Christ hath purchased it;[251] who are in time by the Holy Ghost enabled to believe in Christ according to the gospel.[252]

Q. 60. Can they who have never heard the gospel, and so know not Jesus Christ, nor believe in him, be saved by their living according to the light of nature?
A. They who, having never heard the gospel,[253] know not Jesus Christ,[254] and believe not in him, cannot be saved,[255] be they never so diligent to frame their lives according to the light of nature,[256] or the laws of that religion which they profess;[257] neither is there salvation in any other, but in Christ alone,[258] who is the Savior only of his body the church.[259]


Belgic Confession, week 12

March 25, 2015

Article 19: The Two Natures of Christ

We believe that by being thus conceived the person of the Son has been inseparably united and joined together with human nature, in such a way that there are not two Sons of God, nor two persons, but two natures united in a single person, with each nature retaining its own distinct properties. Thus his divine nature has always remained uncreated, without beginning of days or end of life,[44] filling heaven and earth. His human nature has not lost its properties but continues to have those of a creature– it has a beginning of days; it is of a finite nature and retains all that belongs to a real body. And even though he, by his resurrection, gave it immortality, that nonetheless did not change the reality of his human nature; for our salvation and resurrection depend also on the reality of his body. But these two natures are so united together in one person that they are not even separated by his death. So then, what he committed to his Father when he died was a real human spirit which left his body. But meanwhile his divine nature remained united with his human nature even when he was lying in the grave; and his deity never ceased to be in him, just as it was in him when he was a little child, though for a while it did not show itself as such. These are the reasons why we confess him to be true God and true man– true God in order to conquer death by his power, and true man that he might die for us in the weakness of his flesh.


Shorter Catechism, week 12

March 24, 2015

Q. 21. Who is the Redeemer of God’s elect?
A. The only Redeemer of God’s elect is the Lord Jesus Christ,[55] who, being the eternal Son of God,[56] became man,[57] and so was, and continueth to be, God and man in two distinct natures, and one person, forever.[58]


Children’s Catechism, week 12

March 23, 2015

Q. 41. Can any one be saved through the covenant of works?
A. None can be saved through the covenant of works.

Q. 42. Why can none be saved through the covenant of works?
A. Because all have broken it, and are condemned by it


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 12

March 22, 2015

12. Lord’s Day

Q. 31. Why is he called “Christ”, that is anointed?
A. Because he is ordained of God the Father, and anointed with the Holy Ghost, [a] to be our chief Prophet and Teacher, [b] who has fully revealed to us the secret counsel and will of God concerning our redemption; [c] and to be our only High Priest, [d] who by the one sacrifice of his body, has redeemed us, [e] and makes continual intercession with the Father for us; [f] and also to be our eternal King, who governs us by his word and Spirit, and who defends and preserves us in that salvation, he has purchased for us. [g]

Q. 32. But why art thou called a Christian? [a]
A. Because I am a member of Christ by faith, [b] and thus am partaker of his anointing; [c] that so I may confess his name, [d] and present myself a living sacrifice of thankfulness to him: [e] and also that with a free and good conscience I may fight against sin and Satan in this life [f] and afterwards I reign with him eternally, over all creatures. [g]


Westminster Confession, week 12

March 21, 2015

Chapter 7: Of God’s Covenant with Man

4: This covenant of grace is frequently set forth in scripture by the name of a testament, in reference to the death of Jesus Christ the Testator, and to the everlasting inheritance, with all things belonging to it, therein bequeathed.[150]

5: This covenant was differently administered in the time of the law, and in the time of the Gospel:[151] under the law it was administered by promises, prophecies, sacrifices, circumcision, the paschal lamb, and other types and ordinances delivered to the people of the Jews, all foresignifying Christ to come;[152] which were, for that time, sufficient and efficacious, through the operation of the Spirit, to instruct and build up the elect in faith in the promised Messiah,[153] by whom they had full remission of sins, and eternal salvation; and is called the Old Testament.[154]

6: Under the Gospel, when Christ, the substance,[155] was exhibited, the ordinances in which this covenant is dispensed are the preaching of the Word, and the administration of the sacraments of Baptism and the Lord’s Supper:[156] which, though fewer in number, and administered with more simplicity, and less outward glory, yet, in them, it is held forth in more fullness, evidence, and spiritual efficacy,[157] to all nations, both Jews and Gentiles;[158] and is called the New Testament.[159] There are not therefore two covenants of grace, differing in substance, but one and the same, under various dispensations.[160]


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