Children’s Catechism, week 39

September 26, 2016

Q. 110. What is the first petition?
A. “Hallowed be thy name.”

Q. 111. What do we pray for in the first petition?
A. That God’s name may be honored by us and all men.


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 39

September 25, 2016

39. Lord’s Day

Q. 104. What does God require in the fifth commandment?
A. That I show all honour, love and fidelity, to my father and mother, and all in authority over me, and submit myself to their good instruction and correction, with due obedience; [a] and also patiently bear with their weaknesses and infirmities, [b] since it pleases God to govern us by their hand. [c]


Westminster Confession, week 39

September 24, 2016

Chapter 23: Of the Civil Magistrate

1: God, the supreme Lord and King of all the world, has ordained civil magistrates, to be, under Him, over the people, for His own glory, and the public good: and, to this end, has armed them with the power of the sword, for the defence and encouragement of them that are good, and for the punishment of evil doers.[460]

2: It is lawful for Christians to accept and execute the office of a magistrate, when called thereunto:[461] in the managing whereof, as they ought especially to maintain piety, justice, and peace, according to the wholesome laws of each commonwealth;[462] so, for that end, they may lawfully, now under the New Testament, wage war, upon just and necessary occasion.[463]

3: Civil magistrates may not assume to themselves the administration of the Word and sacraments[4641]; or the power of the keys of the kingdom of heaven[4642]; or, in the least, interfere in matters of faith[4643]. Yet, as nursing fathers, it is the duty of civil magistrates to protect the church of our common Lord, without giving the preference to any denomination of Christians above the rest in such a manner, that all ecclesiastical persons whatever shall enjoy the full, free, and unquestioned liberty of discharging, every part of their sacred functions, without violence or danger[4644]. And, as Jesus Christ hath appointed a regular government and discipline in his church, no law of any commonwealth, should interfere with, let, or hinder, the due exercise thereof, among the voluntary members of any denomination of Christians, according to their own profession and belief[4645]. It is the duty of civil magistrates to protect the person and good name of all their people, in such an effectual manner as that no person be suffered, either upon pretence of religion or infidelity, to offer any indignity, violence, abuse, or injury to any other person whatsoever: and to take order, that all religious and ecclesiastical assemblies be held without molestation or disturbance[4646].

4: It is the duty of people to pray for magistrates,[467] to honor their persons,[468] to pay them tribute or other dues,[469] to obey their lawful commands, and to be subject to their authority, for conscience’ sake.[470] Infidelity, or difference in religion, does not make void the magistrates’ just and legal authority, nor free the people from their due obedience to them:[471] from which ecclesiastical persons are not exempted,[472] much less has the Pope any power and jurisdiction over them in their dominions, or over any of their people; and, least of all, to deprive them of their dominions, or lives, if he shall judge them to be heretics, or upon any other pretence whatsoever.[473]


Canons of Dordt, week 39

September 23, 2016

The Fifth Head of Doctrine: The Perseverance of the Saints

Article 1: The Regenerate Not Entirely Free from Sin

Those people whom God according to his purpose calls into fellowship with his Son Jesus Christ our Lord and regenerates by the Holy Spirit, he also sets free from the reign and slavery of sin, though in this life not entirely from the flesh and from the body of sin.

Article 2: The Believer’s Reaction to Sins of Weakness

Hence daily sins of weakness arise, and blemishes cling to even the best works of God’s people, giving them continual cause to humble themselves before God, to flee for refuge to Christ crucified, to put the flesh to death more and more by the Spirit of supplication and by holy exercises of godliness, and to strain toward the goal of perfection, until they are freed from this body of death and reign with the Lamb of God in heaven.


Larger Catechism, week 38

September 22, 2016

Q. 152. What doth every sin deserve at the hands of God?
A. Every sin, even the least, being against the sovereignty,[982] goodness,[983] and holiness of God,[984] and against his righteous law,[985] deserveth his wrath and curse,[986] both in this life,[987] and that which is to come;[988] and cannot be expiated but by the blood of Christ.[989]

Q. 153. What doth God require of us, that we may escape his wrath and curse due to us by reason of the transgression of the law?
A. That we may escape the wrath and curse of God due to us by reason of the transgression of the law, he requireth of us repentance toward God, and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ,[990] and the diligent use of the outward means whereby Christ communicates to us the benefits of his mediation.[991]


Belgic Confession, week 12

September 21, 2016

Article 19: The Two Natures of Christ

We believe that by being thus conceived the person of the Son has been inseparably united and joined together with human nature, in such a way that there are not two Sons of God, nor two persons, but two natures united in a single person, with each nature retaining its own distinct properties. Thus his divine nature has always remained uncreated, without beginning of days or end of life,[44] filling heaven and earth. His human nature has not lost its properties but continues to have those of a creature– it has a beginning of days; it is of a finite nature and retains all that belongs to a real body. And even though he, by his resurrection, gave it immortality, that nonetheless did not change the reality of his human nature; for our salvation and resurrection depend also on the reality of his body. But these two natures are so united together in one person that they are not even separated by his death. So then, what he committed to his Father when he died was a real human spirit which left his body. But meanwhile his divine nature remained united with his human nature even when he was lying in the grave; and his deity never ceased to be in him, just as it was in him when he was a little child, though for a while it did not show itself as such. These are the reasons why we confess him to be true God and true man– true God in order to conquer death by his power, and true man that he might die for us in the weakness of his flesh.


Shorter Catechism, week 38

September 20, 2016

Q. 73. Which is the eighth commandment?
A. The eighth commandment is, Thou shalt not steal.[161]

Q. 74. What is required in the eighth commandment?
A. The eighth commandment requireth the lawful procuring and furthering the wealth and outward estate of ourselves and others.[162]

Q. 75. What is forbidden in the eighth commandment?
A. The eighth commandment forbiddeth whatsoever doth, or may, unjustly hinder our own, or our neighbor’s wealth or outward estate.[163]


Children’s Catechism, week 38

September 19, 2016

Q. 108. Repeat the Lord’s Prayer.
A. Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Q. 109. How many petitions are there in The Lord’s Prayer?
A. Six.


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 38

September 18, 2016

38. Lord’s Day

Q. 103. What does God require in the fourth commandment?
A. First, that the ministry of the gospel and the schools be maintained; [a] and that I, especially on the sabbath, that is, on the day of rest, diligently frequent the church of God, [b] to hear his word, [c] to use the sacraments, [d] publicly to call upon the Lord, [e] and contribute to the relief of the poor. [f] Secondly, that all the days of my life I cease from my evil works, and yield myself to the Lord, to work by his Holy Spirit in me: and thus begin in this life the eternal sabbath. [g]


Westminster Confession, week 38

September 17, 2016

Chapter 22: Of Lawful Oaths and Vows

4: An oath is to be taken in the plain and common sense of the words, without equivocation, or mental reservation.[452] It cannot oblige to sin; but in any thing not sinful, being taken, it binds to performance, although to a man’s own hurt.[453] Not is it to be violated, although made to heretics, or infidels.[454]

5: A vow is of the like nature with a promissory oath, and ought to be made with the like religious care, and to be performed with the like faithfulness.[455]

6: It is not to be made to any creature, but to God alone:[456] and that it may be accepted, it is to be made voluntarily, out of faith, and conscience of duty, in way of thankfulness for mercy received, or for the obtaining of what we want, whereby we more strictly bind ourselves to necessary duties: or, to other things, so far and so long as they may fitly conduce thereunto.[457]

7: No man may vow to do any thing forbidden in the Word of God, or what would hinder any duty therein commanded, or which is not in his own power, and for the performance whereof he has no promise of ability from God.[458] In which respects, popish monastical vows of perpetual single life, professed poverty, and regular obedience, are so far from being degrees of higher perfection, that they are superstitious and sinful snares, in which no Christian may entangle himself.[459]