Children’s Catechism, week 17

April 27, 2015

Q. 55. Who will be saved?
A. Only those who repent of sin, believe in Christ, and lead holy lives.

Q. 56. What is it to repent?
A. To be sorry for sin, and to hate and forsake it because it is displeasing to God.

Q. 57. What is it to believe or have faith in Christ?
A. To trust in Christ alone for salvation.

Q. 58. Can you repent and believe in Christ by your own power?
A. No; I can do nothing good without the help of God’s Holy Spirit.

Q. 59. How can you get the help of the Holy Spirit?
A. God has told us that we must pray to him for the Holy Spirit.


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 17

April 26, 2015

17. Lord’s Day

Q. 45. What does the “resurrection” of Christ profit us?
A. First, by his resurrection he has overcome death, that he might make us partakers of that righteousness which he had purchased for us by his death; [a] secondly, we are also by his power raised up to a new life; [b] and lastly, the resurrection of Christ is a sure pledge of our blessed resurrection. [c]


Westminster Confession, week 17

April 25, 2015

Chapter 10: Of Effectual Calling

1: All those whom God hath predestinated unto life, and those only, He is pleased, in His appointed time, effectually to call,[215] by His Word and Spirit,[216] out of that state of sin and death, in which they are by nature to grace and salvation, by Jesus Christ;[217] enlightening their minds spiritually and savingly to understand the things of God,[218] taking away their heart of stone, and giving unto them an heart of flesh;[219] renewing their wills, and, by His almighty power, determining them to that which is good,[220] and effectually drawing them to Jesus Christ:[221] yet so, as they come most freely, being made willing by His grace.[222]

2: This effectual call is of God’s free and special grace alone, not from anything at all foreseen in man,[223] who is altogether passive therein, until, being quickened and renewed by the Holy Spirit,[224] he is thereby enabled to answer this call, and to embrace the grace offered and conveyed in it.[225]

3: Elect infants, dying in infancy, are regenerated, and saved by Christ, through the Spirit,[226] who works when, and where, and how He pleases:[227] so also are all other elect persons who are incapable of being outwardly called by the ministry of the Word.[228]

4: Others, not elected, although they may be called by the ministry of the Word,[229] and may have some common operations of the Spirit,[230] yet they never truly come unto Christ, and therefore cannot be saved:[231] much less can men, not professing the Christian religion, be saved in any other way whatsoever, be they never so diligent to frame their lives according to the light of nature, and the laws of that religion they do profess.[232] And to assert and maintain that they may, is very pernicious, and to be detested.[233]


Canons of Dordt, week 17

April 24, 2015

The Second Head of Doctrine: Christ’s Death and Human Redemption Through It

Article 3: The Infinite Value of Christ’s Death

This death of God’s Son is the only and entirely complete sacrifice and satisfaction for sins; it is of infinite value and worth, more than sufficient to atone for the sins of the whole world.

Article 4: Reasons for This Infinite Value

This death is of such great value and worth for the reason that the person who suffered it is — as was necessary to be our Savior — not only a true and perfectly holy man, but also the only begotten Son of God, of the same eternal and infinite essence with the Father and the Holy Spirit. Another reason is that this death was accompanied by the experience of God’s anger and curse, which we by our sins had fully deserved.


Larger Catechism, week 17

April 23, 2015

Q. 74. What is adoption?
A. Adoption is an act of the free grace of God,[307] in and for his only Son Jesus Christ,[308] whereby all those that are justified are received into the number of his children,[309] have his name put upon them,[310] the Spirit of his Son given to them,[311] are under his fatherly care and dispensations,[312] admitted to all the liberties and privileges of the sons of God, made heirs of all the promises, and fellow-heirs with Christ in glory.[313]

Q. 75. What is sanctification?
A. Sanctification is a work of God’s grace, whereby they whom God hath, before the foundation of the world, chosen to be holy, are in time, through the powerful operation of his Spirit[314] applying the death and resurrection of Christ unto them,[315] renewed in their whole man after the image of God;[316] having the seeds of repentance unto life, and all other saving graces, put into their hearts,[317] and those graces so stirred up, increased, and strengthened,[318] as that they more and more die unto sin, and rise unto newness of life.[319]

Q. 76. What is repentance unto life?
A. Repentance unto life is a saving grace,[320] wrought in the heart of a sinner by the Spirit[321] and Word of God,[322] whereby, out of the sight and sense, not only of the danger,[323] but also of the filthiness and odiousness of his sins,[324] and upon the apprehension of God’s mercy in Christ to such as are penitent,[325] he so grieves for[326] and hates his sins,[327] as that he turns from them all to God,[328] purposing and endeavouring constantly to walk with him in all the ways of new obedience.[329]


Belgic Confession, week 16

April 22, 2015

Article 24: The Sanctification of Sinners

We believe that this true faith, produced in man by the hearing of God’s Word and by the work of the Holy Spirit, regenerates him and makes him a “new man,”[57] causing him to live the “new life”[58] and freeing him from the slavery of sin. Therefore, far from making people cold toward living in a pious and holy way, this justifying faith, quite to the contrary, so works within them that apart from it they will never do a thing out of love for God but only out of love for themselves and fear of being condemned. So then, it is impossible for this holy faith to be unfruitful in a human being, seeing that we do not speak of an empty faith but of what Scripture calls “faith working through love,”[59] which leads a man to do by himself the works that God has commanded in his Word. These works, proceeding from the good root of faith, are good and acceptable to God, since they are all sanctified by his grace. Yet they do not count toward our justification– for by faith in Christ we are justified, even before we do good works. Otherwise they could not be good, any more than the fruit of a tree could be good if the tree is not good in the first place. So then, we do good works, but nor for merit– for what would we merit? Rather, we are indebted to God for the good works we do, and not he to us, since it is he who “works in us both to will and do according to his good pleasure” [60]— thus keeping in mind what is written: “When you have done all that is commanded you, then you shall say, ‘We are unworthy servants; we have done what it was our duty to do.’ “[61] Yet we do not wish to deny that God rewards good works– but it is by his grace that he crowns his gifts. Moreover, although we do good works we do not base our salvation on them; for we cannot do any work that is not defiled by our flesh and also worthy of punishment. And even if we could point to one, memory of a single sin is enough for God to reject that work. So we would always be in doubt, tossed back and forth without any certainty, and our poor consciences would be tormented constantly if they did not rest on the merit of the suffering and death of our Savior.

Article 25: The Fulfillment of the Law

We believe that the ceremonies and symbols of the law have ended with the coming of Christ, and that all foreshadowings have come to an end, so that the use of them ought to be abolished among Christians. Yet the truth and substance of these things remain for us in Jesus Christ, in whom they have been fulfilled. Nevertheless, we continue to use the witnesses drawn from the law and prophets to confirm us in the gospel and to regulate our lives with full integrity for the glory of God, according to his will.


Shorter Catechism, week 16

April 21, 2015

Q. 25. How doth Christ execute the office of a priest?
A. Christ executeth the office of a priest, in his once offering up of himself a sacrifice to satisfy divine justice,[68] and reconcile us to God,[69] and in making continual intercession for us.[70]


Children’s Catechism, week 16

April 20, 2015

Q. 52. For whom did Christ obey and suffer?
A. For those whom the Father had given him.

Q. 53. What kind of life did Christ live on earth?
A. A life of poverty and suffering.

Q. 54. What kind of death did Christ die?
A. The painful and shameful death of the cross.


Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s day 16

April 19, 2015

16. Lord’s Day

Q. 40. Why was it necessary for Christ to humble himself even “unto death”?
A. Because with respect to the justice and truth of God, [a] satisfaction for our sins could be made no otherwise, than by the death of the Son of God. [b]

Q. 41. Why was he also “buried”?
A. Thereby to prove that he was really dead. [a]

Q. 42. Since then Christ died for us, why must we also die?
A. Our death is not a satisfaction for our sins, [a] but only an abolishing of sin, and a passage into eternal life. [b]

Q. 43. What further benefit do we receive from the sacrifice and death of Christ on the cross?
A. That by virtue thereof, our old man is crucified, dead and buried with him; [a] that so the corrupt inclinations of the flesh may no more reign in us; [b] but that we may offer ourselves unto him a sacrifice of thanksgiving. [c]

Q. 44. Why is there added, “he descended into hell”?
A. That in my greatest temptations, I may be assured, and wholly comfort myself in this, that my Lord Jesus Christ, by his inexpressible anguish, pains, terrors, and hellish agonies, in which he was plunged during all his sufferings, [a] but especially on the cross, has delivered me from the anguish and torments of hell. [b]


Westminster Confession, week 16

April 18, 2015

Chapter 9: Of Free Will

1: God has endued the will of man with that natural liberty, that is neither forced, nor, by any absolute necessity of nature, determined good, or evil.[204]

2: Man, in his state of innocency, had freedom, and power to will and to do that which was good and well pleasing to God;[205] but yet, mutably, so that he might fall from it.[206]

3: Man, by his fall into a state of sin, has wholly lost all ability of will to any spiritual good accompanying salvation:[207] so as, a natural man, being altogether averse from that good,[208] and dead in sin,[209] is not able, by his own strength, to convert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto.[210]

4: When God converts a sinner, and translates him into the state of grace, He frees him from his natural bondage under sin;[211] and, by His grace alone, enables him freely to will and to do that which is spiritually good;[212] yet so, as that by reason of his remaining corruption, he does not perfectly, or only, will that which is good, but does also will that which is evil.[213]

5: The will of man is made perfectly and immutably free to do good alone in the state of glory only.[214]


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